10 Myths to Stop Believing About Introverts

10 Myths to Stop Believing About Introverts

10 Myths to Stop Believing About Introverts

If you ask anyone to describe an introvert, they might describe the introvert as “shy and quiet” as opposed to their “outgoing and loud” extroverted counterpart. It’s become the standard assumption about introverts that the world has seemed to buy into, despite being wrong on so many levels.If you   know that you’re introverted, then you may find yourself nodding your head through this whole article.

Introverts don’t like being around people.

10 Myths to Stop Believing About Introverts

Not true at all. Introverts tend to prefer keeping small circles of friends they’re close with, as opposed to putting themselves in social situations of large groups of people they don’t know very well. They thrive in more tight-knit social environments.

Introverts aren’t outgoing.

10 Myths to Stop Believing About Introverts

An introvert can be just as outgoing as an extrovert when they’re doing something they love to do. The difference here is that introverts are more sensitive to social stimulation than extroverts, which is why they may seem less outgoing when they’ve maxed out their social energy and need to pull away from all the excitement to recharge themselves.

Introverts hate small talk.

10 Myths to Stop Believing About Introverts

Because introverts tend to reflect inward on their thoughts and emotions, they may appear to be hesitant or less engaged in casual conversation. That doesn’t mean they dislike it, especially if the person or people they’re speaking with are great listeners. In many cases, introverts do prefer to have deeper conversations on topics that matter to them, rather than having to share input on less heavy topics, like the weather or the latest celebrity breakup.

Introverts don’t make good leaders.

10 Myths to Stop Believing About Introverts

According to USA Today, 1 in 10 top executives is an introvert. And while extroverts may be more attracted to leadership positions, they don’t necessarily outperform introverted leaders. Introverts are excellent listeners among those they are leading, and they are naturally inclined to be well-prepared for everything.

Introverts despise public speaking.

10 Myths to Stop Believing About Introverts

A study revealed that the level of public speaking anxiety didn’t relate to whether a person was introverted or extroverted. Instead, fear of public speaking actually has more to do with a person’s own anxious nature, opinion of the audience and confidence in his or her ability to perform well.

Introverts are more negative than extroverts.

10 Myths to Stop Believing About Introverts

Extroverts are energized by being around people, so when they spend too much time alone, they get sad or depressed and may assume that’s what it must feel like to be an introvert. Likewise, some symptoms of depression share similarities with characteristics of introverts, which can cause some confusion. Just because introverts spend more time alone, or are less talkative, doesn’t mean they’re depressed.

Introverts dislike working in teams.

10 Myths to Stop Believing About Introverts

Introverts can be great team players, but only if they know that their input is valued. Similar to how they prefer small groups of close friends to large groups of acquaintances, they’re much more likely to speak up and come out of their shells in smaller teams compared to larger ones.

Introverts lack emotion.

10 Myths to Stop Believing About Introverts

As mentioned previously in the point about small talk, introverts are known to live in their own heads, and they don’t let anyone know what they’re thinking or feeling without first planning out what they’re going to say out loud or express physically. That doesn’t mean they’re not emotional. It’s just harder to see their emotions on the surface.

Introverts are not big risk takers.

10 Myths to Stop Believing About Introverts

Some people wrongly assume introverts are less adventurous because they are far less impulsive than extroverts. Introverts like to look at all sides of a situation and gather as much information as possible so they can make an informed decision. Lots of introverts take big risks—they just prefer to plan everything out in extensive detail first.

Introverts are completely different from extroverts.

10 Myths to Stop Believing About Introverts

Here’s the big secret: Nobody is 100 percent introverted or extroverted! Instead of pegging yourself as simply one or the other, view it as a scale. Pretty much everyone has both introverted and extroverted qualities, even if you identify more with one side than the other. Some people even identify as more neural on the introvert/extrovert scale, so it can be harder to identify closely with just one side.

 

 

 

 

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